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 Post subject: Re: Is interest added to a debt unjust?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 21, 2022 6:57 pm 
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Journeyman
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Peetem wrote:
Vern Humphrey wrote:
Peetem wrote:
The parable isn’t about increasing what we’ve been given. It’s about using what we’ve been given to advance the kingdom. In that case, God will increase what we’ve been given because it’s being used to His glory (e.g., packed down in good measure overflowing).

If it isn't about increasing what we've been given, why are the two servants who doubled the master's money praised, and the one who merely hid the money condemned?

But the point of this post is that Jesus told a parable where he indicated that drawing interest is morally permissible.


Your premise is incorrect.

You are assuming that doubling his money meant he did that via earning interest.


No, I'm not -- where did I say such a thing?

My point is that the unfaithful servant was told he should have put the money out at interest. Clearly, this was acceptable to Jesus.


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 Post subject: Re: Is interest added to a debt unjust?
PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2022 7:58 pm 
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Resident Philosopher
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Vern Humphrey wrote:
Peetem wrote:
Vern Humphrey wrote:
Peetem wrote:
The parable isn’t about increasing what we’ve been given. It’s about using what we’ve been given to advance the kingdom. In that case, God will increase what we’ve been given because it’s being used to His glory (e.g., packed down in good measure overflowing).

If it isn't about increasing what we've been given, why are the two servants who doubled the master's money praised, and the one who merely hid the money condemned?

But the point of this post is that Jesus told a parable where he indicated that drawing interest is morally permissible.


Your premise is incorrect.

You are assuming that doubling his money meant he did that via earning interest.


No, I'm not -- where did I say such a thing?

My point is that the unfaithful servant was told he should have put the money out at interest. Clearly, this was acceptable to Jesus.


With respect, I am not sure your thesis is supported by the text. I say this for several reasons...

1. Since parables contain analogous language, you cannot make a 1to1 comparison to the extent you are doing. For instance, I am not sure that Jesus would approve of debtors prisons where a person would rot until they die and yet that is where the unforgiving servant goes. Rather, he was making a comparison with Hell. So, we have to be careful about reading that backwards as an endorsement of debtors prisons.

2. "Interest" has a few different meanings (which persist to this day). It can mean usury where one simply tries to make money from lending... particularly to people in need. This is condemned. But, it can also mean interest in an investment. It is a word that can mean value added because there was actual ownership in a business venture. So, it is a loan in a sense, but also an investment. This was clearly the case with the first two servants who personally invested and made a return. With the third servant, the master says you could have at least gave it to the bankers who make investments and pay interest to people who deposit. This is not usury. This type of interest is due to people who deposit in banks and those bankers then invest with that money and make profits and then pay meager interest to the depositors. The master said you could have at LEAST done that. (Again, this is keeping with the overall point of the parable which is using what one has been given to further the kingdom. Praise is given to use their gifts directly. For the lazy ones, you could have at least tried to enable someone else to do something, rather than sitting on your butt)

3. Even if the third case was Jesus saying "You could have at least engaged in usury to get SOME return," I think the most you could squeeze from this would be a comparison of evils. It would have been better for him to have been shrewd to get SOME return than to get no return at all. It does not mean that he really endorses either. This is borne out in the fact that the first two servants obviously invested their money.

In short, I think it would be wrong to try to squeeze an endorsement of usury from this parable.

FJ

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 Post subject: Re: Is interest added to a debt unjust?
PostPosted: Wed Feb 23, 2022 12:47 pm 
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