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 Post subject: Seeking faith-informed world history book
PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2014 12:24 am 
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Sons of Thunder
Sons of Thunder

Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2008 1:43 am
Posts: 2584
Location: United States
Religion: Catholic
Can someone recommend a concise world history text, which views history in light of revealed truth? Not overtly religious or triumphalistic, but informed by the Catholic faith. Paperback, hardback, e-book, whatever.

ETA: Or the next best thing?


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 Post subject: Re: Seeking faith-informed world history book
PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2015 10:02 am 
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Citizen
Citizen

Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2015 2:11 pm
Posts: 150
Religion: Catholic
I fear I may not understand the implications of the phrase "history in light of revealed truth." But in Fr Joseph McSorley's Outline History of the Church, each chapter discusses a century since the birth of Jesus Christ, and each of the chapters begins with a section entitled Political Background of the century, which is a good summary of secular activity of the period as it affected the Church.
I strongly recommend Fr McSorley's tremendous effort to present an enormously complex story concisely and relatively impartially. I cannot imagine a reader not finding this a fascinating reference and a springboard to learning more about our Church.
The second section of each chapter covers explicit Church History in four categories: The Papacy; Catholic Life--Doctrines, Discipline, Practice; Opposition; and Missions. The Catholic Life Category is consistently divided into numerous elements, which provide a very convenient reference capability: Official Teachings (Constitutions, Decrees, Bulls, Encyclicals, and other); Councils; Organization (Magesterium); Marriage rulings; Worship; Communities; Saints; Education; and Writers. Although I found this organization difficult and puzzling at first, it is very helpful as a reference once you accept the fact that each category is divided into 20 centuries.
I continue to wonder why the particular emphasis on marriage, and why Missions follows Opposition. Yet perhaps McSorely wanted focus on his concluding thoughts on marriage: "With divorce legalized in nearly every country, with "free-love" popularized by the theatre (sic) and current literature, with the propaganda of birth control carried on vigorously and successfully, the Catholic Church is now being called upon to justify the very existence of marriage." I wonder what his comment might have been about our current pagan celebrations of sodomy, euphemized as gay-marriage.


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