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Student Editions of Patristic Works
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Author:  ForeverFaithful [ Wed Apr 06, 2016 6:12 pm ]
Post subject:  Student Editions of Patristic Works

So I've done 6 semesters of Latin at the university level, and am quite fond of the book we have been using in our directed reading for the Aeneid. It has grammatical notes for all the uncommon construction in the back, and a complete vocabulary.

I was wondering if any like resources exist for Christian authors, and where I might be able to find some to work with over the summer? I would prefer not to break the bank, but also to have a hard copy of what I study.


Pacem Christi

Author:  Obi-Wan Kenobi [ Wed Apr 06, 2016 7:07 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Student Editions of Patristic Works

The closest you will come is the Loeb Classical Library, and that won't have grammatical notes and vocab for you.

Author:  Obi-Wan Kenobi [ Wed Apr 06, 2016 7:13 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Student Editions of Patristic Works

It would not surprise me to learn that there's an annotated version of St. Augustine's Confessions out there too, and maybe City of God, but I would be surprised if there's a market for anything else.

Author:  ForeverFaithful [ Wed Apr 06, 2016 8:46 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Student Editions of Patristic Works

Obi-Wan Kenobi wrote:
The closest you will come is the Loeb Classical Library, and that won't have grammatical notes and vocab for you.


Boethius' Loeb interested me; Loeb's aren't bad since you can scan the passage for unfamiliar vocab to look up and just try and figure out the weird construction from how they're rendered in English.

Shame though. My Aeneid text seems to have been prepared for British school boys, I guess there was never that much a push to study Augustine in the grammar schools.

Author:  Obi-Wan Kenobi [ Wed Apr 06, 2016 9:34 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Student Editions of Patristic Works

Exactly. You can probably find Caesar's The Gallic Wars and Cicero's Orations in the form you're looking for, because together with the Aeneid, they are the three works that made (and to some degree still make) up the standard curriculum for learning Latin. Not so with St. Augustine or the other Fathers.

Author:  Doom [ Wed Apr 06, 2016 9:52 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Student Editions of Patristic Works

Obi-Wan Kenobi wrote:
Exactly. You can probably find Caesar's The Gallic Wars and Cicero's Orations in the form you're looking for, because together with the Aeneid, they are the three works that made (and to some degree still make) up the standard curriculum for learning Latin. Not so with St. Augustine or the other Fathers.


But surely, a large part of the reason for that is because Virgil, Caesar, and Cicero are works which are very easy for a beginning student in Latin to read. I mean, I don't know any Latin, but even I know that The Gallic Wars starts with the words "Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres", or 'Gaul is divided into three parts".

Just like first-year students in Greek usually read Xenophon, for precisely the same reason, that Xenophon is absurdly easy to read for a beginning student in Greek.

I've never tried to read Augustine in Latin, but I doubt he's quite as easy to read as Caesar.

Author:  Obi-Wan Kenobi [ Wed Apr 06, 2016 10:15 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Student Editions of Patristic Works

Caesar, yes, which is why he is traditionally the second-year curriculum. Cicero and Vergil, not so much. Cicero was aiming for more polished rhetoric, and Vergil is poetry with all the unusual word order and constructions that come along with it.

Author:  ForeverFaithful [ Thu Apr 07, 2016 11:02 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Student Editions of Patristic Works

Obi-Wan Kenobi wrote:
Caesar, yes, which is why he is traditionally the second-year curriculum. Cicero and Vergil, not so much. Cicero was aiming for more polished rhetoric, and Vergil is poetry with all the unusual word order and constructions that come along with it.


Ironically, the Latin text I used for 100-201 started with adapted Ovid and worked its way up to real Ovid. From there I studied Lucan and Vergil.

I always viewed prose as the easier kinda Latin, but since I've only ever studied poetry, I don't really know.

Generally how hard is Patristic Latin?

Author:  Obi-Wan Kenobi [ Thu Apr 07, 2016 11:11 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Student Editions of Patristic Works

Dunno. I've never tried to read that much of it. Ecclesial Latin tends to be a bit easier than classical Latin, I think. It relies less on case and uses more prepositions.

Author:  Pelagius [ Sun Apr 10, 2016 11:53 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Student Editions of Patristic Works

If you're okay with just getting excerpts or shorter works from a variety of authors, you could look at Medieval Latin readers like this one.

http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/boo ... 22487.html

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