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 Post subject: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 3:47 pm 
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So, in Latin, what would be the plural of "mus" and the present participle of "mus"?

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 5:48 pm 
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There is no such Latin word, and there's no generic answer. Is there a context for this?

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 6:44 pm 
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Well, Father. There is a word "mus" in Latin - a mouse. And the plural of the "mus" is just "mus."

The little mouse is musculus.

However, "mus" actually refers not just a mouse, but also sable, marten, or ermine

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 7:20 pm 
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Quite right. I should have said, "no Latin verb," since he asked for a participle. The ending -mus is very common for 1st person plural verbs, depending on tense and voice etc., so I'm thinking there must be more to the story.

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 8:55 pm 
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Obi-Wan Kenobi wrote:
Quite right. I should have said, "no Latin verb," since he asked for a participle. The ending -mus is very common for 1st person plural verbs, depending on tense and voice etc., so I'm thinking there must be more to the story.


The context might be a bit anticlimactic - there are two parts to it:
1. I fish, so I like the saying "Piscatur non solum piscator" (there is more to fishing than catching fish).
2. I like the Mouse Hunt app on Facebook, so I was wanting to start a mouse hunting group with the motto "there's more to mousing than catching mice", but all I could find was "mus" (I know almost zero Latin).

Did I ask for the wrong parts of speech? It's okay that it also includes other animals (even if some are of the weasel family rather than rodents).

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ἄξιος εἶ, ὁ κύριος καὶ ὁ θεὸς ἡμῶν, λαβεῖν τὴν δόξαν καὶ τὴν τιμὴν καὶ τὴν δύναμιν, ὅτι σὺ ἔκτισας τὰ πάντα, καὶ διὰ τὸ θέλημά σου ἦσαν καὶ ἐκτίσθησαν. Ἀποκάλυψις 4:11


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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 9:46 pm 
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"Mouse" in that sense is an English colloquialism that doesn't really have a Latin equivalent. It's a verbed noun from a long time ago. I'll try to think if there's a good way to say that in Latin.

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 9:47 pm 
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CC Evans wrote:
Obi-Wan Kenobi wrote:
Quite right. I should have said, "no Latin verb," since he asked for a participle. The ending -mus is very common for 1st person plural verbs, depending on tense and voice etc., so I'm thinking there must be more to the story.


The context might be a bit anticlimactic - there are two parts to it:
1. I fish, so I like the saying "Piscatur non solum piscator" (there is more to fishing than catching fish).
2. I like the Mouse Hunt app on Facebook, so I was wanting to start a mouse hunting group with the motto "there's more to mousing than catching mice", but all I could find was "mus" (I know almost zero Latin).

Did I ask for the wrong parts of speech? It's okay that it also includes other animals (even if some are of the weasel family rather than rodents).

Piscatur non solum piscator- "The fishermen {piscator} does not only fish" is the literal. Piscatur is simply "he fishes". The verb is called deponent because it has an active sense but is passive in form (he fishes is active, he is fished is passive) so if it looked funny to you that could be it.

Maybe try something similar....as mousing is not a standard word really, unless it has very recently been taken as one. It is a neologism and slang. How about

Venatur mus non solum muris venator. literally "The hunter of mouse does not only hunt the mouse" or
Venatur mures non solum murium venator. literally "The hunter of mice does not only hunt mice"

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 9:51 pm 
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Pro Ecclesia Dei wrote:
It is a neologism

The OED has a citation from some time before 1275.

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 9:58 pm 
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Obi-Wan Kenobi wrote:
Pro Ecclesia Dei wrote:
It is a neologism

The OED has a citation from some time before 1275.

I am surprised...it just sounds like it is a neologism...probably because not a common word oh well

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 10:00 pm 
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The verbing of nouns has a long and proud history :fyi:

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2010 10:35 am 
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Oh, by the way, the correct plural for mice is:

MURES not MUS

Cicero wrote:

Itaque non solum inquilini sed etiam mures migrarunt.

This quote is from Latin-German dictionary: http://www.zeno.org/Georges-1913/A/migro

Mus can also mean a rat.

There's a book about Three Blind Mice in Latin:

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2010 11:06 am 
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Pro Ecclesia Dei wrote:
Obi-Wan Kenobi wrote:
Pro Ecclesia Dei wrote:
It is a neologism

The OED has a citation from some time before 1275.

I am surprised...it just sounds like it is a neologism...probably because not a common word oh well
For an ancient Latin, the year 1275 might be considered "new".

I had a priest Old Testament scholar for a couple of grad summer courses who was most interested in the eighth century BC prophets and down to Jeremiah (early 6th century BC at the time of the Exile). But anything post-Exilic, including the New Testament, he would (tongue-in-cheek) disparage as "current events" about which he was not concerned.


Edward Pothier


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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 8:46 am 
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The word "mouse" (mus) and "mice" (mures) do appear in Old Testament:

Leviticus 11:29, 1 Samuel 6, Isaiah 66:17.

So that's long before 1275.

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 8:48 am 
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I think PED was referring to the use of "mouse" as an English verb. I have to say that it's not all that uncommon, either--he jus must not be reading the right sort of books to find it.

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 9:20 am 
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"Mouse" as a verb appeared in 13th century according to Meriam-Webster dictionary.

In many langauges, that would just be translated as "hunt for mice" - chasser des souris in French, for example.

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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Wed Apr 07, 2010 2:36 am 
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:popcorn
Thanks for all the examples and linguistics ideas/ concepts.

Pro Ecclesia Dei wrote:
Venatur mus non solum muris venator. literally "The hunter of mouse does not only hunt the mouse" or
Venatur mures non solum murium venator. literally "The hunter of mice does not only hunt mice"


I appreciate these suggestions and will likely use one or the other.
:salut:

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ἄξιος εἶ, ὁ κύριος καὶ ὁ θεὸς ἡμῶν, λαβεῖν τὴν δόξαν καὶ τὴν τιμὴν καὶ τὴν δύναμιν, ὅτι σὺ ἔκτισας τὰ πάντα, καὶ διὰ τὸ θέλημά σου ἦσαν καὶ ἐκτίσθησαν. Ἀποκάλυψις 4:11


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 Post subject: Re: Latin Question
PostPosted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 7:04 pm 
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The Latin(scientific) name for House Mouse is Mus domestica. Roof rats are Rattus rattus and Norwegian rats are Rattus norvegicus. :fyi:

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