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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 5:07 pm 
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Sons of Thunder
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I am currently reading "Faith of the Early Fathers, Vol. 1" by William A. Jurgens

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 5:17 pm 
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I'm reading a book about Eucharistic miracles.


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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:50 pm 
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Various things, including Father John Gerard's autobiography, which I got for Christmas. It's fascinating and really inspiring so far. :D

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2009 5:27 pm 
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Im reading a couple of books by a norwegian dominican. One on St. Dominic, and another wich is basically a collection of his sermons. Very good stuff, allthough the first one is a bit on the heavy side.

After that I plan on reading "the Mother of the Saviour: and our interior life" by Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange. I have heard its (very) good.

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 2:28 pm 
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The Catholic Mystique

Divine Mercy in My Soul

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 2:41 pm 
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Why Catholic Bibles are Bigger - Gary Michuta

Evangelical is not Enough - Thomas Howard

The Fortune Cookie Chronicles: Adventures in the World of Chinese Food - Jennifer 8 Lee

I'm Just Here for the Food - Alton Brown

Yeah pretty much all I read is about food and faith.


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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2009 5:14 pm 
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Nothing wrong with that. :mrgreen:

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:08 pm 
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Rereading the 2 part of the 1st part of the prima pars of the Summa Theologiae for myself, as well as some articles from the prima-secundae for class

Some essays from Fr. Servais Pinaeckers, OP.

The Canticle for Leibowitz

Happiness in the Christian Life - Paul Waddell

Raymond Brown´s Concise Commentary on The Gospels and Epistles of John, and Fr. Lapide on the same, as well as various essays

A whole ton load of German writings on philosophical anthropology. Gehlen, Pannenberg, et al. As well as St. Thomas´ De Regno.

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 9:01 am 
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Pro Ecclesia Dei wrote:
Rereading the 2 part of the 1st part of the prima pars of the Summa Theologiae for myself, as well as some articles from the prima-secundae for class

Some essays from Fr. Servais Pinaeckers, OP.

The Canticle for Leibowitz

Happiness in the Christian Life - Paul Waddell

Raymond Brown´s Concise Commentary on The Gospels and Epistles of John, and Fr. Lapide on the same, as well as various essays

A whole ton load of German writings on philosophical anthropology. Gehlen, Pannenberg, et al. As well as St. Thomas´ De Regno.


Please, report on reaction to CANTICLE.


GKC

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 11:11 am 
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This is the second time I am reading it...does that speak well enough. The first time I read it in a single day during finals week freshman year at college

I think it is very imaginative and the actions of the characters very well written. Much better than his other work

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 3:30 pm 
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Pro Ecclesia Dei wrote:
This is the second time I am reading it...does that speak well enough. The first time I read it in a single day during finals week freshman year at college

I think it is very imaginative and the actions of the characters very well written. Much better than his other work


Speaks well enough. I consider it one of the crowning jewels of science fiction.

If by other work, you mean WILD HORSE WOMAN, that is a sad story.

GKC

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Save that the sky grows darker yet
And the sea rises higher."


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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2009 6:42 pm 
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Sons of Thunder
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I finished it. I like the second part the best, Fiat Lux.


Now I am reading

Dependent Rational Animals- Alasdair MacIntyre

Leisure, the Basis of Culture- Josef Pieper

among other things

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:22 pm 
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Jedi Padawan
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How far into Leisure have you gotten?

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:45 pm 
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I read it in college.

Can't remember a thing.

GKC

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Yea, naught for your desire,
Save that the sky grows darker yet
And the sea rises higher."


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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:46 pm 
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Pro Ecclesia Dei wrote:
I finished it. I like the second part the best, Fiat Lux.


Now I am reading

Dependent Rational Animals- Alasdair MacIntyre

Leisure, the Basis of Culture- Josef Pieper

among other things


I liked all parts the best.

GKC

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Yea, naught for your desire,
Save that the sky grows darker yet
And the sea rises higher."


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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2009 8:45 am 
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“A Grief Observed” -- C.S. Lewis

C.S. Lewis published “A Grief Observed” under the pseudonym N. W. Clerk, (the N. W. is Anglo-Saxon shorthand for nat whilk, “I know not whom”). In fact, the book was never published under Lewis’ name while he lived. First published in 1961, it has been called an unsettling book and the use of a pseudonym seems to indicate that Lewis knew that it would be found so.

Some argue that it is not about Lewis’ anguish over his wife’s, Joy’s, death but instead an almost fictional account of grief. Mary Borhek summarizes the position of those who hold this view: “The only reasons I can see for believing the book to be a fictionalized account are a desire to distance oneself from the extreme discomfort of confronting naked agony and an unwillingness to grant a revered spiritual leader and teacher permission to be a real, fallible, intensely real human being.”

Still others object to Lewis’ candid expressions of anger at God, suggesting the book demonstrates Lewis’ loss of faith: John Beversluis in his C. S. Lewis and the Search for Rational Religion states that “There is no case for Christianity in this book. Gone are the persuasive arguments and the witty analogies. Gone, too, are the confidence and urbanity evident in The Problem of Pain…The fundamental crisis of the book is a crisis of meaning, a crisis of such paralyzing magnitude that Lewis tries to distance himself from it in every possible way.”

Noelene Kidd in A Grief Observed: Art, Apology, or Autobiography? argues the book “is not simply a record of Lewis’s grief at the loss of his beloved wife…but a dissection of grief itself. The work is chiefly an apology concealed by art.” Still others find the book, "while a deeply moving account of loss, overly introspective and emotional, verging on the maudlin. Yet Lewis avoids bathos in the book at least in part because of a clipped, prose style characterized by short, simple sentences and brief, almost snapshot-like paragraphs. These stylistic devices prevent his wallowing in excessive self-pity; in effect, he becomes a surgeon analyzing a patient’s medical chart. Ironically, of course, he is at the same time both surgeon and patient."

Don King has written:
"A close consideration of the prose style of A Grief Observed suggests the book may be read as vers libre or free verse, poetry relying not upon a regular metrical pattern but instead upon pace or cadence. Furthermore, whereas conventional poetry places a premium upon the foot and the line, free verse finds its rhythm in the stanza. Accordingly, the short paragraphs of A Grief Observed function as stanzas linking it with other ostensibly prose works such as Psalms and the Song of Songs. If we read Lewis’ book this way, we may find that while his focus upon traditional poetic conventions in his consciously conceived poetry actually restrains his poetic impulse—that is, his concern with form overshadows his poetic sensibilities—the release he experiences unconsciously in free verse liberates his poetic impulse so that A Grief Observed becomes his greatest poem."

As I read A Grief Observed I had all this in the back of my mind. Occasionally I would find myself pulling parts of it out and rewriting them in my mind to reflect more of what I saw as in a poetic structure. Here are a few of what I did. I found they made the book more memorable for me. My usual practice is to save a few quotations but this worked out a lot better.

Her Absence
At first I was very afraid of going to places where H. and I had been happy,
Our favorite pub, our favorite wood.
But I decided to do it at once,
Like sending a pilot up again as soon as possible after he’s had a crash.
Unexpectedly, it makes no difference.
Her absence is no more emphatic in those places than anywhere else.
It’s not local at all.
I suppose that if one were forbidden all salt one wouldn’t notice it much more in any one food than in another.
Eating in general would be different, every day, at every meal.
It is like that.
The act of living is different all through.
Her absence is like the sky, spread over everything.


After All Hope Was Gone
It is incredible how much happiness, even how much gaiety, we sometimes had together,
After all hope was gone.
How long, how tranquilly, how nourishingly,
We talked together that last night!
And yet, not quite together.
There's a limit to the 'one flesh.'
You can't really share someone else's weakness, or fear or pain.
What you feel may be bad.
It might conceivably be as bad as what the other felt,
Though I should distrust anyone who claimed that it was.
But it would still be quite different.
When I speak of fear, I mean the merely animal fear,
The recoil of the organism from its destruction;
The smothery feeling; the sense of being a rat in a trap.
It can't be transferred.
The mind can sympathize;
The body, less.
In one way the bodies of lovers can do it least.
All their love passages have trained them to have, not identical, but complementary,
Correlative,
Even opposite, feelings about one another.
We both knew this.
I had my miseries, not hers;
She had hers, not mine.
The end of hers would be the coming-of-age of mine.
We were setting out on different roads.
This cold truth, this terrible traffic regulation
('You, Madam, to the right
-- you, Sir, to the left')
Is just the beginning of the separation
Which is death itself.

Praise Is The Mode Of Love
Praise is the mode of love which always has some element of joy in it.
Praise in due order;
Of Him as the giver,
Of her as the gift.
Don’t we in praise somehow enjoy what we praise,
However far we are from it?
I must do more of this.
I have lost the fruition I once had of H.
And I am far, far away in the valley of my unlikeness,
From the fruition which,
If His mercies are infinite,
I may some time have of God.
But by praising I can still,
In some degree, Enjoy her,
And already, In some degree,
Enjoy Him.
Better than nothing

_________________
His second night in Talkingham, Hazel Motes walked along down town ... The black sky was underpinned with long silver streaks that looked like scaffolding and depth on depth behind it were thousands of stars that seemed to be moving very slowly as if they were about some vast construction work that involved the whole order of the universe and would take all of time to complete. No one was paying attention to the sky.
Flannery O’Connor
http://payingattentiontothesky.com


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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2009 9:02 am 
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derek_jeter wrote:
“A Grief Observed” -- C.S. Lewis

C.S. Lewis published “A Grief Observed” under the pseudonym N. W. Clerk, (the N. W. is Anglo-Saxon shorthand for nat whilk, “I know not whom”). In fact, the book was never published under Lewis’ name while he lived. First published in 1961, it has been called an unsettling book and the use of a pseudonym seems to indicate that Lewis knew that it would be found so.

Some argue that it is not about Lewis’ anguish over his wife’s, Joy’s, death but instead an almost fictional account of grief. Mary Borhek summarizes the position of those who hold this view: “The only reasons I can see for believing the book to be a fictionalized account are a desire to distance oneself from the extreme discomfort of confronting naked agony and an unwillingness to grant a revered spiritual leader and teacher permission to be a real, fallible, intensely real human being.”

Still others object to Lewis’ candid expressions of anger at God, suggesting the book demonstrates Lewis’ loss of faith: John Beversluis in his C. S. Lewis and the Search for Rational Religion states that “There is no case for Christianity in this book. Gone are the persuasive arguments and the witty analogies. Gone, too, are the confidence and urbanity evident in The Problem of Pain…The fundamental crisis of the book is a crisis of meaning, a crisis of such paralyzing magnitude that Lewis tries to distance himself from it in every possible way.”

Noelene Kidd in A Grief Observed: Art, Apology, or Autobiography? argues the book “is not simply a record of Lewis’s grief at the loss of his beloved wife…but a dissection of grief itself. The work is chiefly an apology concealed by art.” Still others find the book, "while a deeply moving account of loss, overly introspective and emotional, verging on the maudlin. Yet Lewis avoids bathos in the book at least in part because of a clipped, prose style characterized by short, simple sentences and brief, almost snapshot-like paragraphs. These stylistic devices prevent his wallowing in excessive self-pity; in effect, he becomes a surgeon analyzing a patient’s medical chart. Ironically, of course, he is at the same time both surgeon and patient."

Don King has written:
"A close consideration of the prose style of A Grief Observed suggests the book may be read as vers libre or free verse, poetry relying not upon a regular metrical pattern but instead upon pace or cadence. Furthermore, whereas conventional poetry places a premium upon the foot and the line, free verse finds its rhythm in the stanza. Accordingly, the short paragraphs of A Grief Observed function as stanzas linking it with other ostensibly prose works such as Psalms and the Song of Songs. If we read Lewis’ book this way, we may find that while his focus upon traditional poetic conventions in his consciously conceived poetry actually restrains his poetic impulse—that is, his concern with form overshadows his poetic sensibilities—the release he experiences unconsciously in free verse liberates his poetic impulse so that A Grief Observed becomes his greatest poem."

As I read A Grief Observed I had all this in the back of my mind. Occasionally I would find myself pulling parts of it out and rewriting them in my mind to reflect more of what I saw as in a poetic structure. Here are a few of what I did. I found they made the book more memorable for me. My usual practice is to save a few quotations but this worked out a lot better.

Her Absence
At first I was very afraid of going to places where H. and I had been happy,
Our favorite pub, our favorite wood.
But I decided to do it at once,
Like sending a pilot up again as soon as possible after he’s had a crash.
Unexpectedly, it makes no difference.
Her absence is no more emphatic in those places than anywhere else.
It’s not local at all.
I suppose that if one were forbidden all salt one wouldn’t notice it much more in any one food than in another.
Eating in general would be different, every day, at every meal.
It is like that.
The act of living is different all through.
Her absence is like the sky, spread over everything.


After All Hope Was Gone
It is incredible how much happiness, even how much gaiety, we sometimes had together,
After all hope was gone.
How long, how tranquilly, how nourishingly,
We talked together that last night!
And yet, not quite together.
There's a limit to the 'one flesh.'
You can't really share someone else's weakness, or fear or pain.
What you feel may be bad.
It might conceivably be as bad as what the other felt,
Though I should distrust anyone who claimed that it was.
But it would still be quite different.
When I speak of fear, I mean the merely animal fear,
The recoil of the organism from its destruction;
The smothery feeling; the sense of being a rat in a trap.
It can't be transferred.
The mind can sympathize;
The body, less.
In one way the bodies of lovers can do it least.
All their love passages have trained them to have, not identical, but complementary,
Correlative,
Even opposite, feelings about one another.
We both knew this.
I had my miseries, not hers;
She had hers, not mine.
The end of hers would be the coming-of-age of mine.
We were setting out on different roads.
This cold truth, this terrible traffic regulation
('You, Madam, to the right
-- you, Sir, to the left')
Is just the beginning of the separation
Which is death itself.

Praise Is The Mode Of Love
Praise is the mode of love which always has some element of joy in it.
Praise in due order;
Of Him as the giver,
Of her as the gift.
Don’t we in praise somehow enjoy what we praise,
However far we are from it?
I must do more of this.
I have lost the fruition I once had of H.
And I am far, far away in the valley of my unlikeness,
From the fruition which,
If His mercies are infinite,
I may some time have of God.
But by praising I can still,
In some degree, Enjoy her,
And already, In some degree,
Enjoy Him.
Better than nothing


I did a paper in grad school on GRIEF. My opinons are close to Kidd.

GKC

_________________
"I tell you naught for your comfort,
Yea, naught for your desire,
Save that the sky grows darker yet
And the sea rises higher."


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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Fri Feb 20, 2009 11:55 am 
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I am reading "Der Pianist" in German. This is about Władysław Szpilman, a Polish Jew pianist who survived the World War II.

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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2009 11:55 am 
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The Clash of Orthodoxies
Robert P. George

Robert P. George is McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University and the co-author of Embryo, his most recent offering, and prior to that his most successful book, The Clash of Orthodoxies.

Orthodoxies was the first book that bent my mind around the fundamental changes I needed to make on becoming a Catholic: namely that I was no longer a conservative Republican, that I needed to identify my politics and political thinking with Jesus Christ and my Church.

Orthodoxies takes its title from the Samuel Harrington book of a few years back “The Clash of Civilizations," where Harrington predicted a clash of the world’s major civilizations: the West, the Islamic world, and the Confucian East. George would point out that many in the West have already abandoned the Judeo-Christian worldview in favor of the "isms" of contemporary American life -- feminism, multiculturalism, gay liberationism, lifestyle liberalism -- the family called "the secularist orthodoxy."

Secularism rejects the proposition central to the Judeo-Christian tradition of thought about issues of life and death: that human life is morally inviolable and is intrinsically, and not merely instrumentally, good. It also rejects condemnation of abortion, suicide, infanticide of so-called defective children.

Marriage, for secularists, is a legal convention whose goal is to support a merely emotional union and it also rejects the Judeo-Christian understanding of marriage as a bodily, emotional, and spiritual union of one man and one woman, existing for the generating, nurturing, and educating of children -- an inherently heterosexual institution. According to secularist orthodoxy, same-sex "marriages" are no less truly marriages than those between partners of opposite sexes who happen to be infertile. And orthodox secularism, consistent with its view of what marriage is, declines to view marriage as the principle of rectitude in sexual conduct.

George’s position does battle with secularism on the field of rational debate. He points out that secularism is itself a sectarian doctrine and shows us that religiously informed moral judgment can be based upon and defended by appeal to publicly accessible reasons. Indeed, he argues “that sound religious faith and moral theology will be informed, in part, by insight into the authentic and fully public reasons provided by principles of natural law and natural justice” He “accepts the proposition that reason can and should be used to identify moral truths, including truths of political morality, but claims that Judeo-Christian morality is rationally superior the morality of orthodox secularism.”

The book was a wonderful read and I use it often as a resource for defending Church views against secularists. The problem is that outside of these particular social issues, I’ve yet to find a book that expounds a viable Catholic worldview on war with Islamic terrorists, tax policies, energy issues and a host of others that make up a fully informed political view.

I try to read George Weigel but aside from collections of his essays, I'm unsure if he has ever put out the sort of thinking-from-these-Catholic-basics that I am looking for. If you have any recommendations, I’d be deeply appreciative if someone could point me towards an updated Rerum Novarum with summaries and distillations of Pius XI's Quadragesimo Anno (1931), John XXIII's Mater et Magistra (1961), and John Paul II's Centesimus Annus (1991). Put it all together and you have Catholic Political Thought 101, if you follow my drift...

Thanks in advance.

_________________
His second night in Talkingham, Hazel Motes walked along down town ... The black sky was underpinned with long silver streaks that looked like scaffolding and depth on depth behind it were thousands of stars that seemed to be moving very slowly as if they were about some vast construction work that involved the whole order of the universe and would take all of time to complete. No one was paying attention to the sky.
Flannery O’Connor
http://payingattentiontothesky.com


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 Post subject: Re: What are you reading?
PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 2009 5:33 pm 
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I'm currently mostly reading "The spiritual life" by The very reverend Tanquerey S.S.D.D

I'm not far into it, but I'm learning so much, and he writes in such a way that even I can understand it. I really enjoy it. I have also started on St. Thomas Aquinas book on God (part of Summa contra Gentiles) and then I also have been reading a bit in "The Catholic controversy"


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