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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 1:18 am 
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Some Poor Bibliophile
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Peregrinator wrote:
GKC wrote:
Thomas Kratman (I do not recommend you try Kratman).

Now there's a recommendation that I should have taken seriously (if I had remembered it). I read the first in the Carrera series, thinking, how can one go wrong with a book titled "A Desert Called Peace"?



Warned you.

Gonna try another?

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 8:27 am 
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GKC wrote:
Peregrinator wrote:
GKC wrote:
Thomas Kratman (I do not recommend you try Kratman).

Now there's a recommendation that I should have taken seriously (if I had remembered it). I read the first in the Carrera series, thinking, how can one go wrong with a book titled "A Desert Called Peace"?



Warned you.

Gonna try another?

Nope. And it's not just the politics. One gets tired of the "hero cries himself to sleep over his dead wife" cliche.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 9:15 am 
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Some Poor Bibliophile
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Peregrinator wrote:
GKC wrote:
Peregrinator wrote:
GKC wrote:
Thomas Kratman (I do not recommend you try Kratman).

Now there's a recommendation that I should have taken seriously (if I had remembered it). I read the first in the Carrera series, thinking, how can one go wrong with a book titled "A Desert Called Peace"?



Warned you.

Gonna try another?

Nope. And it's not just the politics. One gets tired of the "hero cries himself to sleep over his dead wife" cliche.


Ah, well. Not surprised.

I buy them all.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 10:25 am 
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Thinks2much wrote:
viking wrote:
I thought I'd pick up a sci-fi book from the library but I don't really know which authors are good in this genera. Also what is the best Catholic sci-fi?


A brief history of SF

Precursors rooted in the crime/science short stories of the 19th century
Edgar Poe; believed to be the father of SF -- see short sf collections
Edwin Abott also noted precursor w Flatland:A Romance of many dimensions
Jules Verne, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

I have read only the first page yet, so please forgive me if this has been stated before.

I have never heard Poe referred to as Father of Science Fiction. I usually hear Jules Gabriel Verne or H G Wells. Sometimes, Hugo Gernsback. But never Edgar Allan Poe. Am I correct?

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2015 2:49 pm 
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Jack3 wrote:
Thinks2much wrote:
viking wrote:
I thought I'd pick up a sci-fi book from the library but I don't really know which authors are good in this genera. Also what is the best Catholic sci-fi?


A brief history of SF

Precursors rooted in the crime/science short stories of the 19th century
Edgar Poe; believed to be the father of SF -- see short sf collections
Edwin Abott also noted precursor w Flatland:A Romance of many dimensions
Jules Verne, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

I have read only the first page yet, so please forgive me if this has been stated before.

I have never heard Poe referred to as Father of Science Fiction. I usually hear Jules Gabriel Verne or H G Wells. Sometimes, Hugo Gernsback. But never Edgar Allan Poe. Am I correct?



That list you posted is not notably helpful. While Poe is certainly a minor figure in the history of SF

http://www.amazon.com/Science-Fiction-P ... 0140431063

he's no way a father of the genre. Wells or Verne are much more basic to the field, yes.

Some historians of the field will trace it back to the early 18th century, or further back into classical periods (Aldiss/BILLION YEAR SPREE, Baily/ PILGRIMS THROUGH TIME AND SPACE, Nicholson/VOYAGES TO THE MOON, all do this to an extent), looking for the earliest possible origin for SF, but anything before Verne is really just an academic exercise.


For good Catholic SF, names like Gene Wolfe, John Wright, and Tim Powers come to mind, and, in a way, Walter Miller, but it is best you get recommendations from other folk on this.

Generally, which authors might be considered good in SF will vary, according to who you ask. After reading the stuff for 60+ years, I certainly have my favorites, but not all agree with me.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2015 2:47 pm 
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Well, the first sci-fi I read was Jules Vernes' 20,000 Leagues under the Sea. I wore out the VHS of Disney's version of the story and read the book a number of times.

I read a lot of ebooks and I have no money, so I read a lot of public domain stories. Along the way, I discovered a bunch of horrible writers and some great ones. One of the best sci-fi writers I discovered was H. Beam Piper. His Paratimes series is a great time travel series. His Uller Uprising was an alien retelling of the Sepoy Revolt. And who can forget Lone Star Planet, which is basically Planet Texas.

I would also recommend Space Prison by Tom Gowin. A Gern cruiser captures an enemy colony ship and maroons the occupants on a deadly planet to die. The survivors overcome the odds and it is an interesting read.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2015 4:21 pm 
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JohnPaulW wrote:
Well, the first sci-fi I read was Jules Vernes' 20,000 Leagues under the Sea. I wore out the VHS of Disney's version of the story and read the book a number of times.

I read a lot of ebooks and I have no money, so I read a lot of public domain stories. Along the way, I discovered a bunch of horrible writers and some great ones. One of the best sci-fi writers I discovered was H. Beam Piper. His Paratimes series is a great time travel series. His Uller Uprising was an alien retelling of the Sepoy Revolt. And who can forget Lone Star Planet, which is basically Planet Texas.

I would also recommend Space Prison by Tom Gowin. A Gern cruiser captures an enemy colony ship and maroons the occupants on a deadly planet to die. The survivors overcome the odds and it is an interesting read.



I've read less of Piper than I should, but the Paratime series, esp. Lord Kalvan, and his SPACE VIKING were among my favorites. Sad that he, like Walter Miller, left the field early and voluntarily.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2015 8:06 pm 
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GKC wrote:
JohnPaulW wrote:
Well, the first sci-fi I read was Jules Vernes' 20,000 Leagues under the Sea. I wore out the VHS of Disney's version of the story and read the book a number of times.

I read a lot of ebooks and I have no money, so I read a lot of public domain stories. Along the way, I discovered a bunch of horrible writers and some great ones. One of the best sci-fi writers I discovered was H. Beam Piper. His Paratimes series is a great time travel series. His Uller Uprising was an alien retelling of the Sepoy Revolt. And who can forget Lone Star Planet, which is basically Planet Texas.

I would also recommend Space Prison by Tom Gowin. A Gern cruiser captures an enemy colony ship and maroons the occupants on a deadly planet to die. The survivors overcome the odds and it is an interesting read.



I've read less of Piper than I should, but the Paratime series, esp. Lord Kalvan, and his SPACE VIKING were among my favorites. Sad that he, like Walter Miller, left the field early and voluntarily.


Unfortunately, Piper committed suicide because he thought he was a failure as a writer. We could have had more Paratime stories, maybe some more stories from the Lone Star Planet.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2015 8:13 pm 
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JohnPaulW wrote:
GKC wrote:
JohnPaulW wrote:
Well, the first sci-fi I read was Jules Vernes' 20,000 Leagues under the Sea. I wore out the VHS of Disney's version of the story and read the book a number of times.

I read a lot of ebooks and I have no money, so I read a lot of public domain stories. Along the way, I discovered a bunch of horrible writers and some great ones. One of the best sci-fi writers I discovered was H. Beam Piper. His Paratimes series is a great time travel series. His Uller Uprising was an alien retelling of the Sepoy Revolt. And who can forget Lone Star Planet, which is basically Planet Texas.

I would also recommend Space Prison by Tom Gowin. A Gern cruiser captures an enemy colony ship and maroons the occupants on a deadly planet to die. The survivors overcome the odds and it is an interesting read.



I've read less of Piper than I should, but the Paratime series, esp. Lord Kalvan, and his SPACE VIKING were among my favorites. Sad that he, like Walter Miller, left the field early and voluntarily.


Unfortunately, Piper committed suicide because he thought he was a failure as a writer. We could have had more Paratime stories, maybe some more stories from the Lone Star Planet.


And he had a messy divorce, and an agent who hadn't kept him informed on sales. Sad.

I'd take a few more Terro-Human History tales, too.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2015 10:02 am 
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Speaking of science fiction, yesterday I finally finished A Canticle for Leibowitz and I am well on my way to finishing The Mote in God's Eye.

Is the sequel to Leibowitz any good?

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2015 11:53 am 
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Doom wrote:
Speaking of science fiction, yesterday I finally finished A Canticle for Leibowitz and I am well on my way to finishing The Mote in God's Eye.

Is the sequel to Leibowitz any good?



No. I finished it as a necessity, because that's what I do. But the fact that Miller labored so long on it, and was unable to bring it to closure, is reflected in the work.

Good for you on CANTICLE AND MOTE. I was listening to the radio adaptation last night.

Next read Vinge's A FIRE UPON THE DEEP.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Wed Dec 02, 2015 5:41 am 
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Not sure if it is considered Sci-Fi, but has anyone read The man in the high castle? Any thoughts?


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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:14 pm 
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Gerty wrote:
Not sure if it is considered Sci-Fi, but has anyone read The man in the high castle? Any thoughts?



It is Science Fiction. It is the only Dick novel I can marginally appreciate.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Sat Dec 05, 2015 2:43 pm 
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GKC wrote:
Gerty wrote:
Not sure if it is considered Sci-Fi, but has anyone read The man in the high castle? Any thoughts?



It is Science Fiction. It is the only Dick novel I can marginally appreciate.


So not something worth prioritize for someone with a limited time to read?

Reading Out of the silent planet now. Enjoying it so far.


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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Sat Dec 05, 2015 6:11 pm 
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Gerty wrote:
GKC wrote:
Gerty wrote:
Not sure if it is considered Sci-Fi, but has anyone read The man in the high castle? Any thoughts?



It is Science Fiction. It is the only Dick novel I can marginally appreciate.


So not something worth prioritize for someone with a limited time to read?

Reading Out of the silent planet now. Enjoying it so far.



The only reason I found it of even marginal interest was that it is a form of alternate history SF, which I like. Otherwise, I couldn't recommend it, or any other Dick work.

OUT OF THE SILENT PLANET is one of my favorites; first read it in around 1957, first really understood it about 5 years later. I do recommend continuing with the trilogy.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 5:36 pm 
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Doom wrote:
Is the sequel to Leibowitz any good?


Fr. Obi-wan is a fan. :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 5:39 pm 
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I honestly don't remember liking The Man in the High Castle particularly, and I'm a fan of Dick's work.

The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldricth, Flow My Tears the Policeman Said, and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep are probably the top three. We Can Build You and A Scanner Darkly are also pretty good.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 7:37 pm 
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Peregrinator wrote:
I honestly don't remember liking The Man in the High Castle particularly, and I'm a fan of Dick's work.

The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldricth, Flow My Tears the Policeman Said, and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep are probably the top three. We Can Build You and A Scanner Darkly are also pretty good.



STIGMATA, along with Vonnegut's CAT'S CRADLE, tempted me to turn off my SF reading, in the mid 60s.

I got over it.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2015 11:52 pm 
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I never really thought of Cat's Cradle as SF -- it's more satire than anything else -- or for that matter of Vonnegut as a writer of SF, except for Player Piano.

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 Post subject: Re: Sci-fi
PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2015 2:12 pm 
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Peregrinator wrote:
I never really thought of Cat's Cradle as SF -- it's more satire than anything else -- or for that matter of Vonnegut as a writer of SF, except for Player Piano.



CAT'S CRADLE came through the SFBC, mid sixties. Counted as SF to me. Also was the period when I was trying Delany's TRITON and DHALGREN, J.G. Ballard's stuff, Norman Spinrad, such like. Much of a muchness. I moved on quickly.

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