Login Register

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 1   [ 9 posts ]   
Author Message
 Post subject: Prolegomena to Saint Thomas Aquinas
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2005 10:07 pm 
Offline
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2005 9:27 am
Posts: 64
Location: Houston, TX
I've started to read the Summa Theologica at New Advent, but I've noticed that St. Thomas uses some terminology that I'm not familiar with (such as 'patient intellect'). I'm assuming that his vocabulary largely comes from Aristotle. Consequently, I'd like to spend some time with Aristotle, whom I've never read, as a way of working up to Aquinas. Can anyone give me some suggestions on works (including translation recommendations)?

Also, as a third year Greek student, I can plod my way through relatively basic Greek, and I have read some excerpts from De Anima and Physics (I took a class on the Presocratics last Spring). Should I try and work my way through Aristotle in Greek, or would you recommend working on my Latin and trying to use the Latin translation of Aristotle that St. Thomas used (assuming he used a Latin translation, and that we have the text of that translation)? Or are English versions fine for understanding Aquinas?

Thanks,
Christopher


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2005 10:10 pm 
Offline
Jedi Master
Jedi Master
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 31, 2002 9:55 am
Posts: 82388
Location: 1.5532386636 radians
Religion: Catholic
Church Affiliations: 4th Degree KofC
The standard English translations of St. Thomas are fine. Kreeft's Summa of the Summa and A Shorter Summa each include definitions up front.

The best beginner's book on Aristotle is probably Mortimer Adler's Aristotle for Everybody. Aristotle himself--in Latin, Greek, or English--can be quite frustrating to read without a guide.

As far as the Summa itself goes--I recommend either Kreeft book, but this online guide, written ca. 1940, might be very helpful, too.

_________________
Nos autem in nomine Domini Dei nostri

Need something to read?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2005 10:14 pm 
Offline
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2005 9:27 am
Posts: 64
Location: Houston, TX
Thanks - that should about take care of my summer reading!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2005 11:57 pm 
Offline
Journeyman
Journeyman

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 12:44 am
Posts: 1210
Location: BC
When reading, just keep in mind that faulty Latin translations of the Greek Fathers led St. Thomas to some pretty inaccurate conclusions. So whenever you see him quoting a Greek Father, check it out at the source (just to be careful; a faulty translation led St. Thomas to believe that we should give Latria worship to the cross).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2005 12:09 am 
Offline
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2005 9:27 am
Posts: 64
Location: Houston, TX
Thanks for the warning. What sources would you recommend? I doubt my Greek is good enough to correct the translation mistakes of others - one must learn before one can teach, after all!

Having said that, though, are the texts of any of the Greek Fathers online anywhere? And are there any good commentaries for poor Greek students who find reading Diogenes Laertius a prelude to Purgatory?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2005 1:09 am 
Offline
Journeyman
Journeyman

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 12:44 am
Posts: 1210
Location: BC
I'm learning Greek too, and as a poor Greek student, I would suggest a translation; New Advent has them under the Fathers section. (Back in the day, "Greek Fathers" just referred to the fathers of the Eastern Church).

You don't need to check them too religiously, just when something sounds wrong (like giving latria worship to the Cross).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2005 9:46 am 
Offline
Sons of Thunder
Sons of Thunder
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 13, 2003 9:34 pm
Posts: 29150
Location: Sine Domum
Religion: Roman Catholic
SeanMc wrote:
When reading, just keep in mind that faulty Latin translations of the Greek Fathers led St. Thomas to some pretty inaccurate conclusions. So whenever you see him quoting a Greek Father, check it out at the source (just to be careful; a faulty translation led St. Thomas to believe that we should give Latria worship to the cross).

Where does he say that?

_________________
Quoniam sapientia aperuit os mutorum, et linguas infantium fecit disertas.

http://stomachosus-thomistarum.blogspot.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2005 10:53 am 
Offline
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2004 9:24 pm
Posts: 4
Pro Ecclesia Dei wrote:
SeanMc wrote:
When reading, just keep in mind that faulty Latin translations of the Greek Fathers led St. Thomas to some pretty inaccurate conclusions. So whenever you see him quoting a Greek Father, check it out at the source (just to be careful; a faulty translation led St. Thomas to believe that we should give Latria worship to the cross).

Where does he say that?


"Damascene (De Fide Orth. iv, 16) quotes Basil as saying: 'The honor given to an image reaches to the prototype,' i.e. the exemplar. But the exemplar itself--namely, Christ--is to be adored with the adoration of 'latria'; therefore also His image. ... Christ's cross should be worshiped with the adoration of 'latria.'" (Summa Theologiae, III, q. 25 a. 3-4)

The Catholic Encyclopedia says ("The True Cross"):
Quote:
This clear doctrine [of Nicaea II and the Council of Trent], which cuts short every objection, is also that taught by Bellarmine, by Bossuet, and by Petavius. It must be said, however, that this view was not always so clearly taught. Following Bl. Albertus Magnus and Alexander of Hales, St. Bonaventure St. Thomas, and a, section of the Schoolmen who appear to have overlooked the Second Council of Nic├Ža teach that the worship rendered to the Cross and the image of Christ is that of latria, but with a distinction: the same worship is due to the image and its exemplar but the exemplar is honoured for Himself (or for itself), with an absolute worship; the image because of its exemplar, with a relative worship. The object of the adoration is the same, primary in regard to the exemplar and secondary in regard to the image. To the image of Christ, then, we owe a worship of latria as well as to His Person. The image, in fact, is morally one with its prototype, and, thus considered, if a lesser degree of worship be rendered to the image, that worship must reach the exemplar lessened in degree. Against this theory an attack has recently been made in "The Tablet", the opinion attributed to the Thomists being sharply combated. Its adversaries have endeavoured to prove that the image of Christ should be venerated but with a lesser degree of honour than its exemplar.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2005 11:47 am 
Offline
Newbie
Newbie

Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2005 9:27 am
Posts: 64
Location: Houston, TX
SeanMc,

Thanks - I had forgotten the writings of the Fathers were at New Advent.

Christopher

_________________
-- Christopher

"If I have brought any message today, it is this: Have the courage to have your wisdom regarded as stupidity. Be fools for Christ. And have the courage to suffer the contempt of the sophisticated world."
-- Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 1   [ 9 posts ]   


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Denise Dee and 2 guests


Jump to: