Login Register

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 1   [ 6 posts ]   
Author Message
 Post subject: Thomas Reid.... contemporary and critic of Hume
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 11:21 am 
Offline
Journeyman
Journeyman

Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2005 10:13 am
Posts: 1412
Location: Wisconsin
Religion: Roman Catholic
I've read a lot of criticisms of skepticism in general and Hume in particular.
I've come across many modern writers who critique Hume and sometimes they'll reference the thought of earlier thinkers whose views would be antithetical and critical of Hume too.... but I never see Thomas Reid being referenced.

Is there a reason why Reid doesn't come up often as a reference point to criticisms directed at Hume's reasoning?

_________________
For who we are and what we'll be/ I'll sing your praise eternally/ the miles we've shared I'd trade but few/ they're the ones that kept me away from you.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thomas Reid.... contemporary and critic of Hume
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 3:01 pm 
Offline
Criminally Insane Cucumber
Criminally Insane Cucumber
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 2:20 pm
Posts: 32643
Location: The countertop
Religion: The True One
Church Affiliations: OblSB
Reid has been getting some attention in english-speaking philosophy over the last generation or so, but he remains a relatively minor figure. As to why he's not a bigger star, I dunno--for the same reason that Malebranche isn't, I guess, which is (as far as I can see) that's just how it went. Looking for too much rationality here would overlook the faddish nature of philosophy.

Catholic philosophers, specifically, haven't felt much need to draw from Reid because he's basically a kind of scholastic-lite. I mean, he (comically) thinks he's the first philosopher to have rejected representationalism. So there's a real ignorance of pre-modern philosophy (as was typical of the philosophers of his time, and ours). And part and parcel of that is that a great deal of his "common sense" approach to philosophy is kind of Aristotelianism without the seriously worked out metaphysics that underlie a proper philosophical grasp of the world. It's not that he's wrong, so much as that he's a bit thin. If you're a Catholic, you'll be well advised to study St. Thomas instead of Thomas Reid. (Actually you'd be well advised to study St. Thomas instead of Thomas Reid regardless of whether you're a Catholic.) This is of course a kind of false dilemma since there's no reason not to study both, and since Reid wrote after Hume he was able to give direct refutations of Humeanism in a way that St. Thomas obviously couldn't. Analytic philosophers--say, William Alston--however, who can't stomach metaphysics at such a deep level, often find Reid very satisfying. Lots of the famous modern Protestant philosophers, Alston as well as Plantinga and others, have been influenced by Reid's reliabilist epistemology in particular.

_________________
Image
The Medal of St. Benedict

Suscipe me secundum eloquium tuum, et vivam: et non confundas me ab exspectatione mea.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thomas Reid.... contemporary and critic of Hume
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 3:17 pm 
Offline
Journeyman
Journeyman

Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2005 10:13 am
Posts: 1412
Location: Wisconsin
Religion: Roman Catholic
Crazy, I just came across the name "Malebranche", moments before reading your post, and was just thinking "Malebranche? Wasn't that the name of one of the tar pit devils in Dante's Inferno?"

Thanks for all of that information.
In reading Feser there seems to be a reoccurring theme that many modern philosophers view themselves as inventing the wheel, being willfully (or otherwise) ignorant of the traditions that came before them.

_________________
For who we are and what we'll be/ I'll sing your praise eternally/ the miles we've shared I'd trade but few/ they're the ones that kept me away from you.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thomas Reid.... contemporary and critic of Hume
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 3:22 pm 
Offline
Journeyman
Journeyman

Joined: Tue Nov 01, 2005 10:13 am
Posts: 1412
Location: Wisconsin
Religion: Roman Catholic
Ha!
After your mention of Malebranche I'm not reading how his view of Occasionalism served as a starting point for Hume to eventually claim that causes and effects are not linked in a meaningful way as understood by Aristotle's efficient causation.

Crazy how many religious thinkers (particularly Catholic) have developed philosophical views that to some extent lead to a secular attempt to undermine the basis for that religious point of view.

_________________
For who we are and what we'll be/ I'll sing your praise eternally/ the miles we've shared I'd trade but few/ they're the ones that kept me away from you.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thomas Reid.... contemporary and critic of Hume
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:36 pm 
Offline
Criminally Insane Cucumber
Criminally Insane Cucumber
User avatar

Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 2:20 pm
Posts: 32643
Location: The countertop
Religion: The True One
Church Affiliations: OblSB
Hume has been well described as Malebranche without God. I think I mentioned The Unity of Philosophical Experience to you recently--it really does a masterful job of laying out the connections between the modern philosophers. Malebranche was really just working out ideas latent in Descartes, and Hume was just taking them all to their logical conclusions. (Throw in a bit of Berkeley here and there for seasoning.)

_________________
Image
The Medal of St. Benedict

Suscipe me secundum eloquium tuum, et vivam: et non confundas me ab exspectatione mea.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Thomas Reid.... contemporary and critic of Hume
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 7:35 pm 
Offline
King of Cool

Joined: Sun May 11, 2003 1:30 pm
Posts: 75397
Religion: Anticukite Catholic
gherkin wrote:
Hume has been well described as Malebranche without God. I think I mentioned The Unity of Philosophical Experience to you recently--it really does a masterful job of laying out the connections between the modern philosophers. Malebranche was really just working out ideas latent in Descartes, and Hume was just taking them all to their logical conclusions. (Throw in a bit of Berkeley here and there for seasoning.)


A good summary of all of this can be found in Mortimer J Adler's book 'Ten Philosophical MIstakes'


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic Page 1 of 1   [ 6 posts ]   


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests


Jump to: