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 Post subject: Rosaries, scapulars, holy water…and so on
PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 8:28 pm 
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First let me start by saying that I’m not a catholic, yet, so please bear with me because I have a lot of questions.

Question the first: I bought and pray the rosary, it’s absolutely wonderful and really helps strengthen my faith. Will a priest bless my rosary even though I’m not catholic? Also, would it be wrong to wear the rosary around my neck as a constant reminder to pray it? Right now I keep it in my pocket but it would be much easier to get at if it was around my neck.

Ok next onto scapulars. All the info I’ve found on them doesn’t really help me figure out what they do. Can someone please give me a very quick rundown of that?

Almost done now, holy water. I’ve read that if you cross yourself with holy water some sins are forgiven. Does this take the place of confession or is it complementary to it?

Finally, this one could probably be useful to me, St. Joseph's Cord. It seems to me to almost be sort of like the rosary only related to chastity and St. Joseph. Does anyone actually use it? Personally I think that I could benefit from a constant reminder of chastity.

Thank you all for your time and answers.

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 8:47 pm 
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Good questions, Tom, and some that I've been curious about, myself. I look forward to the answers :)

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:01 pm 
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You don't have to be Catholic to have religious items blessed by a priest.

Rosaries aren't usually worn as necklaces, but I have one that was made to be worn.

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:03 pm 
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http://www.kensmen.com/catholic/stjosephcords.html st. josephs cord

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 Post subject: Re: Rosaries, scapulars, holy water…and so on
PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:04 pm 
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tom58 wrote:
Will a priest bless my rosary even though I’m not catholic? Also, would it be wrong to wear the rosary around my neck as a constant reminder to pray it? Right now I keep it in my pocket but it would be much easier to get at if it was around my neck.


The first priest I ever met blessed a rosary for me, and I was not Catholic yet. I think, though I don't know, that as you are looking to convert, one will bless it. But as for wearing it around your neck, that's kind of not popular. ;) You may be assumed to be treating it like a fashion accessory, not as a sacramental.

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:05 pm 
Tom58,
Quote:
Ok next onto scapulars. All the info I’ve found on them doesn’t really help me figure out what they do. Can someone please give me a very quick rundown of that?


I would highly recommend carefully reading this explanation of the scapular. The Brown Scapular was given to the Carmelite Order as a sign of their desire to follow Christ Jesus through devotion to Our Lady of Mount Carmel. A critical part of that teaching is that the scapular IS NOT some sort of magical charm that ensures salvation! Others can wear it as a sign of that commitment to Christ. There is enrollment in what is called the Confraternity of the Brown Scapular. The form of that is listed on the website page.

One thing that is a common error with the Brown Scapular in the the Sabbatine Privilege. According to The Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel: Catechesis and Ritual, "in 1613, the Holy See determined that the decree establishing the 'Sabbatine Privilege' was unfounded." "We may believe that The Blessed Mother will assist the souls of the deceased members of the Confraternity, especially Saturdays." However, the so-called Sabbatine Privilege and the Papal Bull that decreed it are erroneous.


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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:13 pm 
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but using holy water forgives venial sins. But that does not take the place of confession, because mortal sins can only be forgiven through the sacrament of reconciliation.

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:23 pm 
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Thank you, the answers so far have been very helpful.

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 9:40 pm 
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The use of holy water in the earliest days of the Christian Era is attested by documents of only comparatively late date. The "Apostolic Constitutions", the redaction of which goes back to about the year 400, attribute to the Apostle St. Matthew the precept of using holy water. The letter written under the name of Pope Alexander I, who lived in the second century, is apocryphal and of more recent times; hence the first historical testimony does not go back beyond the fifth century. However, it is permissible to suppose for the sake of argument that, in the earliest Christian times, water was used for expiatory and purificatory purposes, to a way analogous to its employment under the Jewish Law. As, in many cases, the water used for the Sacrament of Baptism was flowing water, sea or river water, it could not receive the same blessing as that contained in the baptisteries

St. Epiphanius (Contra haeres., lib. I, haer. xxx) records that at Tiberias a man named Joseph poured water on a madman, having first made the sign of the cross and pronounced these words over the water: "In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, crucified, depart from this unhappy one, thou infernal spirit, and let him be healed!" Gregory of Tours (De gloria confess., c. 82) tells of a recluse named Eusitius who lived in the sixth century and possessed the power of curing quartan fever by giving its victims to drink of water that he had blessed. It is known that some of the faithful believed that holy water possessed curative properties for certain diseases, and that this was true in a special manner of baptismal water. In some places it was carefully preserved throughout the year and, by reason of its having been used in baptism, was considered free from all corruption. This belief spread from East to West; and scarcely had baptism been administered, when the people would crown around with all sorts of vessels and take away the water, some keeping it carefully in their homes whilst others watered their fields, vineyards, and gardens with it ("Ordo rom. I", 42, in "Mus. ital.", II, 26).

However, baptismal water was not the only holy water. Some was permanently retained at the entrance to Christian churches where a clerk sprinkled the faithful as they came in and, for this reason, was called hydrokometes or "introducer by water", an appellation that appears in the superscription of a letter of Synesius in which allusion is made to "lustral water placed in the vestibule of the temple".

This water was perhaps blessed in proportion as it was needed, and the custom of the Church may have varied on this point. Balsamon tells us that, in the Greek Church, they "made" holy water at the beginning of each lunar month. It is quite possible that, according to canon 65 of the Council of Constantinople held in 691, this rite was established for the purpose of definitively supplanting the pagan feast of the new moon and causing it to pass into oblivion. In the West Dom Martène declares that nothing was found prior to the ninth century concerning the blessing and aspersion of water that takes place every Sunday at Mass. At that time Pope Leo IV ordered that each priest bless water every Sunday in his own church and sprinkle the people with it: "Omni die Dominico, ante missam, aquam benedictam facite, unde populus et loca fidelium aspergantur" (P.L., CXV, col. 679). Hincmar of Reims gave directions as follows: "Every Sunday, before the celebration of Mass, the priest shall bless water in his church, and, for this holy purpose, he shall use a clean and suitable vessel. The people, when entering the church, are to be sprinkled with this water, and those who so desire may carry some away in clean vessels so as to sprinkle their houses, fields, vineyards, and cattle, and the provender with which these last are fed, as also to throw over their own food" ("Capitula synodalia", cap. v, in P.L., CXXV, col, 774). The rule of having water blessed for the aspersion at Mass on Sunday was thenceforth generally followed, but the exact time set by Leo IV and Hincmar was not everywhere observed. At Tours, the blessing took place on Saturday before Vespers; at Cambrai and at Aras, it was to be given without ceremony in the sacristy before the recitation of the hour of Prime; at Albi, in the fifteenth century, the ceremony was conducted in the sacristy before Terce; and at Soissons, on the highest of the sanctuary steps, before Terce; whereas at Laon and Senlis, in the fourteenth century, it took place in the choir before the hour of Terce. There are two Sundays on which water is not and seems never to be blessed: these are Easter Sunday and Pentecost. The reason is because on the eve of these two feasts water for the baptismal fonts is blessed and consecrated and, before its mixture with the holy chrism, the faithful are allowed to take some of it to their homes, and keep it for use in time of need.

As far as your question of Holy Water forgiving venial sins, I'm not sure. I read a few websites on the subject and none of them expliciting implied that it does...but they didn't imply that it doesn't either. So.. :?: Maybe someone else with a better understanding could answer?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 10:55 pm 
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Also, from what I understand, the graces obtained through the sacramentals, such as holy water, have a lot to do with the heart - when one has great faith in the power of God through the sacramentals, they receive that grace abudantly; one who does not believe may not receive any graces through a sacramental.

Correct me if I'm wrong.

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2005 11:06 pm 
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You are correct blondie, the disposition of the person does have alot to do with the graces received.

On scapulars, one could compare it to a wedding ring. Although the wedding ring is not the cause of the love that one spouse bears to another, yet it is a visible sign for all the world to see of the lover's devotion and fidelity to the beloved.

So also the scapular is an external sign of the devotion and love that we have for Mary. It is not like a pagan charm that has power in and of itself but it is a sign to show Mary that we Love Her and God and that we trust in Her and Her Son. She is so happy when you wear this sign of devotion to her and She is so generous, that She has promised to save all who wear it. Like a wedding ring, the scapular shows that we are bound to Mary......and no one who is bound to Mary can be lost.

Who could not love a Mother so generous and Loving!

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PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 12:24 am 
I keep a bottle of Holy Water at home so I can cross myself with it before I go out. I also spinkle it in each room every week while saying the Prayer of St Michael, to keep evil away.

I never ever travel without my Scapular. The Blessed Mother has promises attached to wearing the Scapular with faith. Many incredible miracles are attributed to it.

I have so many Rosaries. I keep one in my car, one in my purse, one in my prayer packet and dozens at home. They remind me of Our Lord Jesus Christ and to pray pray pray!
Yours in Christ, Natty :D


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PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 4:27 am 
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WorBlux wrote:
http://www.kensmen.com/catholic/stjosephcords.html st. josephs cord


Thanks for this link.... I wasn't aware of this before.

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PostPosted: Fri May 06, 2005 8:57 am 
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lowdenclear wrote:
WorBlux wrote:
http://www.kensmen.com/catholic/stjosephcords.html st. josephs cord


Thanks for this link.... I wasn't aware of this before.


Yes this link was very informative!

Deffinitly could use that reminder too...it's hard to live a holy life these days.

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